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All-Natural Weed Killer - That Works!

Summer is finally here!  The flowers are blooming, the grass is growing, and so are the weeds!  

So many times I hear people ask how to kill weeds without harmful chemicals.  Here is my solution:
I start with a 24 ounce spray bottle and cover the bottom with salt.  I held it up to the light so you could see how much salt I use...since I don't measure it!
Then, I fill it up with vinegar and add a few drops of dish soap.  Any brand will do since it just helps the solution stick to the leaves.  Shake it up and don't forget to label the bottle.
The only thing left to do is spray the weeds.  As you can see, I got this one good and wet.
Two hours later...
Isn't that amazing?  
I've been using this solution for years and it's never let me down.  One thing I will tell you, though, it seems to work better on a sunny day.  
Do you have a 'go-to' weed killer?  Be sure to tell us about it in the comments.  As, always, thanks for stopping by and Happy Father's Day to all the Dads out there!



I hope you'll pin, share, comment, and follow.  If you click on those 3 little lines at the top right of the blog, you'll see where to find me!

Comments

  1. Wow! That's easy enough for me to try! Thanks for sharing. :D

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  2. I use straight vinegar and that works well for me too. I do know the stronger the vinegar the faster it works. Thanks for sharing on To Grandma's House We Go!

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    Replies
    1. I've heard that too. Cleaning vinegar is supposed to be a bit stronger than regular vinegar, although I've used both with success!

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  3. Wow, I'm definitely going to give this a try. I have all the ingredients already!

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    Replies
    1. Having the ingredients is the best part!

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  4. I am assuming that it's a big no no on grass.

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    1. I used it to kill grass covering patio blocks before I ripped it all off, so, only use on grass if you want it dead. If you're careful, you can use it to kill weeds in the grass. Just watch the over-spray.

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  5. Great tip, Ann! Thanks for sharing at Vintage Charm!

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  6. This is great! Thanks for sharing at the Friday at the Fire Station link up! I love how this is so much better than toxic chemicals!

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  7. Have you heard of using epsom salt instead of regular salt?

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    Replies
    1. I have, Mercy, but I've always had good luck with regular table salt. Thanks for stopping by!

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  8. Another easy way is to use a paint tray and roller. Pour the solution in the tray and roll it on your brick patio, sidewalk, or other flat areas to rid it of vegetation. works great and a gallon of vinegar will cover about 750 sq. feet.

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    Replies
    1. That's another great way of using it. Thanks for sharing!

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  9. What is good to spray on vegetables for bugs,beans ,orka,etc.

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    1. You can make a spray with vegetable oil and soap - a cup of oil and a tablespoon of dish soap. Add a few teaspoons of it to a spray bottle and fill with water. Spray it on your plants.

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  10. Sub Epson Salts instead of table salt. The table salt will damage the soil underneath and nothing will grow in that area.

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    Replies
    1. I didn't know that, but I haven't had any trouble.

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  11. I will try this the next time my lawn is cut and I can get rid of weeds too . Vinegar seems to do a lot of things. thanks

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  12. This article is so innovative and well constructed I got plenty of information from this post. Keep writing related to the topics on your site.

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  13. Borax sprinkled liberally along the edges of our gravel driveway works well to keep the grass and other weeds from creeping into the drive. Spread it around just before a light rain.

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    Replies
    1. That's another good tip, Kay. Thank you!

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  14. I've been looking for a solution to use around the edges of my vegetable garden. I'm going to try your solution. Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. My pleasure, Rhonda. It really works and you don't have to worry about any toxic chemicals!

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