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Frame Redone & the Original Owners

UPDATE:
We had a visit from the niece and nephew of the original owners of our house. Tim had seen a lot of the work we've done, but this was the first time his sister had been here since we bought it. When she saw the photo of their aunt & uncle in the dining room she blew them a kiss, turned to me, with tears in her eyes, and said, "Thank you for having them here". 
It touched my heart... 

Keep in mind, this couple built this house in 1931 and were the only people to live in it previous to us.  Fran lived to be 101 and was loved by all who knew her.  We feel honored to live in their house.

I thought I'd share a little bit of history along with a recycled frame. Apparently, there is entirely too much light in the dining room, because it was impossible to get a good shot of this frame and photo - glare everywhere!

Meet the original owners of The Cottage:

This was the only angle that had very little glare.

Here's a close-up of the pic:

Meet Fran and Ernie, the original owners of our home.  This photo was take in the living room in 1961.  How do I know that? The original photo had a date on the back and there is a piece of the carpet in the attic. Pretty cool, huh?

We purchased the home from their estate.  That's right, they were the only owners - until us!  We've learned so much about them and the cottage from their nephew - it was built in 1940, they had no children, Ernie passed away in the '80s and Fran lived to be 101 years old.

It was only right to have a photo of them in this house and I wanted a pretty frame.  I found this one at a flea market:
Not so pretty...

especially that velour ribbon - which peeled right off!

All it needed was a can of spray paint:
and the transformation was complete.

So much better!

The photo is an a plain frame and is surrounded by this, more ornate frame.  The perfect way to honor the couple that built and loved this home for so many years!

We continue to learn bits and pieces about them and the history of this house.  For instance, they had a wedding reception in the basement (see that space HERE) and used to have wonderful parties.  I wish I could have met them, they must have been fun people.  

Thank you for stopping by.  I hope you enjoyed hearing a little more about the cottage.  Now I must get back to work on the front door.  Yes, it's getting a fresh coat of paint...stay tuned to see what color we finally chose!

Have a great week!

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Comments

  1. How nice that you have details about your house. Frame look perfect. Visiting from Amaze Me Monday. Linda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Linda. We love hearing about the house and its previous owners!

      Delete
  2. I bet the house was in tip top shape also when you bought it?
    the frame looks much better painted

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It needed some work, but nothing like a lot we saw!
      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  3. Nice story, and history to the cottage.
    Love the new frame!!
    Debbie

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Ann! :)
    What an amazing way to honor the previous owner by putting their photo in your home! They look so happy in the photo! :)
    It sounds like they had many happy memories there.
    The frame is beautiful too!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beautiful! :) I love the look of painted frames, and you did a fantastic job!

    ReplyDelete

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